Telling Our Stories Training Program
Sep
28
to Sep 29

Telling Our Stories Training Program

If you work in the arts, heritage and culture sector, ART ON THE MOVE and Museums and Galleries Australia WA are combining their collective and extensive skills to offer a two day intensive professional development program

The training will explore curating, preparing, presenting and interpreting an exhibition be it artistic or historic.


Venue: Ngurin Pilbara Aboriginal Centre, Roe Street, Roebourne WA (opposite the old Victoria Hotel) 

Cost: $240.00* includes refreshments and lunch
*Individuals requiring financial assistance will be considered on a case by case basis
 

Email artmoves@artonthemove.com.au for more information. 

Book online here. 

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Telling Our Stories Training Program
Nov
2
to Nov 3

Telling Our Stories Training Program

If you work in the arts, heritage and culture sector, ART ON THE MOVE and Museums and Galleries Australia WA are combining their collective and extensive skills to offer a two day intensive professional development program

The training will explore curating, preparing, presenting and interpreting an exhibition be it artistic or historic.


Venue: Army Museum, Artillery Barracks, Burt Street Fremantle WA

Cost: $240.00* includes refreshments and lunch
*Individuals requiring financial assistance will be considered on a case by case basis

Email artmoves@artonthemove.com.au for more information. 

Book online here. 

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Beyond Archive, Beyond Hope, Beyond Democracy?
Sep
22
3:45pm 3:45pm

Beyond Archive, Beyond Hope, Beyond Democracy?

Public Lecture with Verne Harris

Tim Winton Lecture Theatre, Building 213:101, Curtin University, Bentley

Time: 3:45pm for a 4:00pm start

RSVP: MCCAAdmin@curtin.edu.au by Wednesday 13 September

The Centre for Human Rights Education and the Department of Information Studies at Curtin University would like to invite you to a public lecture by award-winning South African archivist and scholar, Verne Harris. This lecture will explore the role of archive and memory work in struggles for social justice within a frame set up by these questions:

  • What does Nelson Mandela’s legacy mean in South Africa today?
  • Is democracy an oppressive apparatus?
  • Does whiteness still exercise hegemony globally?
  • Is there hope for the human project?

About Verne Harris

Director of Archive and Dialogue at the Nelson Mandela Foundation, Verne Harris was Mandela’s archivist from 2004 to 2013. He is an honorary research fellow with the University of Cape Town, participated in a range of structures which transformed South Africa’s apartheid archival landscape, including the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, and is a former Deputy Director of the National Archives. Widely published, he is probably best-known for leading the editorial team on the best-seller Nelson Mandela: Conversations with Myself. He is the recipient of an honorary doctorate from the University of Cordoba in Argentina (2014), archival publication awards from Australia, Canada and South Africa, and both his novels were short-listed for South Africa’s M-Net Book Prize. He has served on the Boards of Archival Science, the Ahmed Kathrada Foundation, the Freedom of Expression Institute, and the South African History Archive.

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Sep
21
5:30pm 5:30pm

The 2017 History Council Lecture by Emeritus Professor Ann Curthoys & Dr Shino Konishi.

This lecture explores Australia’s politics of race leading up to the 1967 Referendum. The referendum aimed to change the Australian constitution in order to grant the Commonwealth the power for the first time to make laws specifically concerning Indigenous people and to include them in the census. It was passed by 90.77% of voters. In exploring the historical context for the Referendum, I look first at the political upheavals concerning race in the 1960s, with special attention to the Freedom Ride of 1965, in which I was involved. I trace the broader international influences on Australian racial politics. I also look further back in time to explore why it was that constitution-making in Australia, whether for self-governing colonies in the British Empire or for the new nation of Australia in 1901, so consistently involved visions of self-determination from which Indigenous people were excluded. Finally, I ask, what is the legacy of these histories for Australia today?

Ann Curthoys is an honorary professor at UWA and Emeritus Professor at ANU. She has written widely on aspects of Australian history, and on questions of historical theory and writing. Her books include Freedom Ride: A Freedom rider Remembers (2002); Is History Fiction? (with John Docker, 2005); How to Write History that People Want to Read (with Ann McGrath, 2009). She has edited many collections of essays. Her latest book, written jointly with Jessie Mitchell, Taking Liberty: Indigenous Rights and Settler Self-Government, is currently in press with Cambridge University Press.

After the Referendum… the emotional things changed by Shino Konishi.

Indigenous memories’ Since the late 1990s a number of historians have argued against the ‘myth’ that the 1967 Referendum granted Aboriginal people the right to vote, pointing out that the Referendum only concerned enabling the Commonwealth Government to legislate for Aboriginal people, and including Indigenous people in the census. Yet, as Frances Peters-Little observes, the Referendum meant so much more for Aboriginal people, and is remembered as the time we became citizens in our own country. In this presentation, I will build on her work, exploring Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people’s memories of the 1967 Referendum, and in particular, the way emotions imbue these memories.

Shino Konishi is a descendant of the Yawuru people of Broome. She is a historian based at UWA, and is a chief investigator in the ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions. Her books include The Aboriginal Male in the Enlightenment World (2012) and the co-edited collections Indigenous Intermediaries: New Perspectives on the Exploration Archives (2015) and Brokers and Boundaries: Colonial Exploration in Indigenous Territory (2016). She is now beginning a new ARC project on Indigenous biography

Great Southern Room, 4th Floor, Alexander Library Building, Perth Cultural Centre

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History Post-Brexit: thinking through Britain, Europe and Empire
Sep
21
4:00pm 4:00pm

History Post-Brexit: thinking through Britain, Europe and Empire

  • The University of Western Australia (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

A public lecture by Tony Ballantyne, Co-Director of the Centre for Research on Colonial Culture, University of Otago.

The links between British empire building and its shifting relationships with Europe have frequently been overlooked by historians, in part because they have been seen as two fundamentally distinct fields of inquiry.

Using the debates around Brexit as it departure point, this talk explores some of the key connections between the project of empire building and Britain’s engagements with Europe, tracing some key points of convergence from the 1760s on. But it will also explore the shifting terrain of recent historiography, tracing the ways in which Europe and empire have figured within British historical writing since the 1970s and how those relationships have also figured in important work from the former settler colonies.

Tony Ballantyne is a Professor of History and Pro-Vice Chancellor Humanities at the University of Otago, where he is also a Co-Director of the Centre for Research on Colonial Culture. He has published widely on the cultural history of the British Empire and his most recent sole-authored book is the award-winning Entanglements of Empire: Missionaries, Maori and the Question of the Body (Duke University Press, 2015).

Fox Lecture Theatre, Arts, UWA

Reserve your seat: http://www.ias.uwa.edu.au/lectures/ballantyne

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Coastal Connections in the Colonial Northwest
Sep
21
1:00pm 1:00pm

Coastal Connections in the Colonial Northwest

Professor Alistair Paterson will present new research on the history of the Northwest and explore what the colonial coastal frontier was like for Aboriginal communities facing the extreme challenges of European settlement. Bringing together archival sources, collected objects held in museums with historical archaeological fieldwork, a new regional analysis will be revealed producing a new history of the Northwest, 100 years since J.S. Battye’s History of the Northwest.

 

Venue

Great Southern Room, SLWA

 

image: Alistair Paterson

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UWA Research Week
Sep
4
to Sep 8

UWA Research Week

In Research Week, we celebrate and promote the work that we do at UWA in discovering new knowledge and creating new methods and techniques for the community that we serve.

We invite all people to come along and see what UWA is doing in research, to ask questions that you would like solved and to meet some of our fantastic researchers.

http://www.researchweek.uwa.edu.au/

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Aug
29
10:30am10:30am

UWA professor to tell all about history of Dalkeith, Nedlands

It's not a CTW project, but promises to be interesting anyway :)

Come along to a talk by CTW Chief Investigator Jenny Gregory. The Emeritus Professor builds on her doctorate from 30 years ago to reveal how Dalkeith and Nedlands became what they are.

Nedlands Library.

http://www.communitynews.com.au/western-suburbs-weekly/news/learn-history-of-dalkeith-nedlands-at-uwa-talk/

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The Destruction of Memory SOLD OUT
Aug
17
6:30pm 6:30pm

The Destruction of Memory SOLD OUT

A film screening followed by a panel discussion with Professor Andrea Witcomb, Deakin University; Professor Ben Smith, UWA; Dr John Taylor, UWA; Rebecca Repper, Oxford University and UWA.

Join us for this powerful award-winning film on the war against culture, and the battle to save it.

Theatre Auditorium, The University Club of Western Australia

Cost: Free

Audience: General Public, Faculty/Staff, Students, Alumni

Book: https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/the-destruction-of-memory-film-screening-tickets-35854968175

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Botanical Wonderland
Aug
10
to Sep 24

Botanical Wonderland

Explore the botanical wonders of Western Australia in this exhibition of original material from the collections of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society, Western Australian Museum and the State Library of Western Australia. 
Discover the many ways Western Australians have interpreted the State’s rich plant life. From pressed seaweed, to wildflower painting, embroidery, photography and depicted in porcelain – botanical wonders have inspired and defined Western Australia.

Image: Acc 9131A/4: Lilian Wooster Greaves, pressed wildflower artwork, ‘Westralia’s Wonderful Wildflowers’, c1929

 

Venue:

The Nook, State Library of Western Australia

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